Outbound Field Trips Gallery

Benefits of School Trips

Going on a field trip means more than simply leaving the school grounds. Field trips will always have an educational element, but the impact of field trips can extend much further. Field trips give students the chance to build closer bonds with their classmates, experience new environments and enjoy time away from the classroom. Students often return to the classroom with a renewed focus on their schoolwork.

Field Trips reinforce what a teacher has been teaching in class and helps students understand the topic better. Teachers turn trips into mobile classrooms, helping students to collect data, then quizzing them or assigning a project based on what they learned during the outing.

Students develop a connection to the community as they visit local establishments that they might not encounter otherwise. This sometimes boosts the students’ interest in being an active citizen to help preserve what makes the community special. It may also help to create an interest in new professions.


Year 7 Bangkok Barge Trip April 2017

Year 7 students had to be up early for a 4:00 am start on their way to Phuket Airport then Bangkok and their ultimate destination, a beautiful 20 meter long converted rice barge on the Chao Phraya River which would be their home for the next three days. We arrived at the barge by late morning and were greeted by the Barge Program crew who gave the students a brief outline of life on the barge and activities they would be taking part in.

Students took in turns to prepare meals, plan games and take part in bird-watching and navigation exercises. They also had to wash up their own plates and cutlery to inspection standard. This was an excellent environment for team building and many of them surprised themselves with what they were able to achieve. One of the biggest challenges, particularly for some of the girls, appeared to be being able to have a shower in 3 minutes which was strictly timed with penalties for running over time.

We made some stops along route up the river to disembark and take tuk tuks to visit a Buddhist temple, a museum and a Thai market where students had to buy ingredients for the evening meal.

Students closely examined river vegetation and found numerous lifeforms within it including tiny crabs and shrimps. They also carried out chemical analysis of the water to check how healthy or polluted it may be and when a clean area of the river was found the barge dropped anchor and students and staff were allowed to get life jackets on and jump in.

Year 8 and 9 Khao Sok Trip April 2017

Just before the Songkran break, 12 Year 8 students and 25 Year 9 students were lucky enough to embark on an adventurous escapade into the jungle. Mobile phones were switched for playing cards, Wi-Fi signal swapped for conversation, and 7-11 toasties and snacks ditched for organic, homemade food.

Sleeping in floating bungalows on a lake within Khao Sok National Park, the students spent their free time back-flipping from diving platforms, kayaking in mountain shadows and swimming from pier to pier. Mornings and evenings were spent on longboat safaris, the tours offering awesome opportunities to see monkeys, gibbons, birds and even wild elephants in their natural habitat.

Just after arriving at Ratchbrapha Dam, the Year 8 students went to a weaving farm where they learned how to produce silk and even did some weaving themselves. On Day 2 they visited a cave where they used only a head-torch to find living creatures in the cave. This helped them to understand the food chain in a cave. Day 3 consisted of studying a stream where they had to work out the flow rate of water into the Ratchbrapha Dam and determine the water quality in the stream. A process called kick sampling was used to record the presence of invertebrates in the water.

In preparation for their Duke of Edinburgh award next year, the Year 9 students also intrepidly engaged in two adventurous excursions. The first was a hike through the jungle to a viewpoint, the vista offering a mass expanse of lake and jungle and mountain. The second was in the depths of a cave, armed with nothing but a helmet and a head-torch. The cave in particular inspired many a scream, from bats and spiders and leeches to shoulder-deep pools and waterfalls in the dark.

The final day culminated in a competition where the Year 8 and Year 9 students competed in groups in some fun Water Sports Activities. Students made floating rafts out of cardboard, kayaked with flip flops and speedily swam in water competitions. Disgracefully, it was a Year 8 team who won the overall competition.

After four weary days in the jungle, the final KFC pit stop in Phang Nga was most welcome.

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